Being Fully Alive at the End of Life

 

Today is the Feast Day of St. Ireneus, whose most famous statement was, ‘the Glory of God is the human being fully alive.”  How does this relate to End of Life (EOL) Care? Is a fully alive human being one who stays alive for as long as possible, extending bodily life indefinitely with chemicals, and machines, tubes hooked up to every orifice? I think not. Fully alive means attending to the life of the spirit as well as the body, and as St. Augustine said in sermon 127, “If so much care and labor then is spent on gaining a little additional length of life, how ought we to strive after life eternal?” 

As populations age all over the world, and people live longer with more chronic conditions such as heart disease, cancer, diabetes, stroke, etc. churches face the wonderful challenge of reminding parishioners that the life of the spirit can be cultivated when a person is diagnosed with a life limiting illness, and that palliative care must always include spiritual care, or it is not truly palliative care. The root word of “palliative” is “pallium”, which denotes the wool cloak the Pope places on the shoulders of a bishop to remind him to care for his sheep. The Pallium Niche in the vault of St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome contains the wool woven by nuns from the sheep raised at Vatican farms.Conf-Pallium-cm 

Spiritual distress toward the end of life is often profound, both for believers and non-believers, and clinicians need to learn to recognise it so that they can bring in a spiritual care professional or member of the clergy, if requested, to counsel patients and caregivers when the end is near.

A newly published study in the Journal of Palliative Medicine showed that clergy had “poor knowledge of EOL care, and that 75% desired more EOL training…Clergy described ambivalence about, and a passive approach to, counseling congregants about decision making despite having defined beliefs regarding EOL care.”  The study concluded that “poor knowledge of EOL care,” and I would add of the teachings of the church re palliative care, “may lead clergy to passively enable congregants with serious illness to pursue potentially nonbeneficial treatments that are associated with increased suffering.”

The good news is that focused education by trained practitioners can overcome ambivalence, passivity, and poor knowledge of EOL care. The bad news is that pursuing non-beneficial treatments exacerbates the physical, socio-economic, and spiritual distress of patients and families. Instructing doctors and nurses to “do everything possible” to keep a patient alive runs counter to the Catechism of the Catholic Church, which teaches that “Discontinuing medical procedures that are burdensome, dangerous, extraordinary, or disproportionate to the expected outcome can be legitimate; it is the refusal of “over-zealous” treatment.”  (2278)

The key words are “non-beneficial, burdensome, and disproportionate to the expected outcome.” The family, patient, and palliative care team, including the spiritual care provider, need to know how to unpack what those terms mean for that particular patient and family, preferably before a crisis, not during one, when people are in the rough waves and chaos of active dying.  

Human beings nearing death can also, paradoxically, be fully alive, and as many hospice doctors, nurses, volunteers, and caregivers who have attended the dying can attest, they are often at their most luminous and alive when supported by good palliative care, which includes pain relief as well as confident spiritual counseling.  Happy Feast Day!

 

 

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kpettus

I am a political theorist, oblate in the Order of St.Benedict, and advocate for universal rational access to essential controlled medicines for pain and palliative care in the lower and middle income countries. I work a lot in Vienna at the Commission on Narcotic Drugs, and in Geneva at the World Health Organisation, and the Human Rights Council representing the International Association for Hospice and Palliative Care.

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